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About Canadian HorsesAbout Canadian Horses

Canadian Horses, originally called the French Canadian Horse, was introduced to Canada in July 1665 by King Louis XIV of France. Initially, King Louis XIV sent 12 of his best horses to reward the men who had gone to settle "New France". France continued to import these horses, and by 1763, their number was close to 13,000. However, as exporting the horse continuously increased for the Boer war in Africa, plantations in the West Indies, and to the United States for stage lines and the Civil War, by the 1860s and 1870s, there were fewer than 400 Canadian Horses with fewer than 20 registrations per year. To preserve the remaining of the breed and keep the horse from going extinct, a stud book was produced in 1886. The decrease of horses slowed down, but it wasn't until 1895 that the Canadian Horse Breeders Association was formed. In 1907, the Federal Government livestock commissioner started a new stud book with improved standards.

Canadian mares are very fertile. They can reproduce regularly until the age of 20 or older.
Many Canadian Horses are bred for driving. They are also used for riding, jumping, hunting, farming, and light draft. Because of their endurance and calmness, they are considered to be a general purpose horse. They have endurance and a calm, docile, good-natured disposition.

Canadian Horses have a very muscular build with a long body, strong arched neck, well structured head, large and widely spaced expressive eyes, small ears, a fine muzzle, strong legs, a heavy and wavy mane, and a heavy and high set tail. Canadian Horses are usually black or dark brown, but they also come in chestnut and bay. They stand between 14.3 and 16.2 hands high, and can weigh between 1000 and 1400 pounds. They are believed by some to be the strongest horse breed for it's size.

New registrations of the Canadian Horse have been stable since 2000 at 450 to 500 annually. There are now more than 6,000 horses registered.


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